True Hope

For in this hope we were saved. Now hope that is seen is not hope. For who hopes for what he sees? But if we hope for what we do not see, we wait for it with patience. ~Romans 8:24-25

Who hopes for what he sees? Me. What I mean is that I can hope for a little while for that which I don’t see, but when my timing doesn’t seem to be working out well and I’m not seeing results, my hope dims. It may even cease, or I can become cynical. But really I am fooling myself – hope that is seen is not hope. I really have the wrong definition of hope. Hope today implies a measure of uncertainty or concern around whether the longed for thing or event will actually occur. It lies close to worry and dreaming in implication. Hope in the Greek in the Bible is the expectation of what is sure or certain. True hope is characterized by confidence and trust.

Paul contextually is speaking about all of creation groaning and longing with us for Jesus to return. I am waiting and hoping for Christ to return, for him to complete his work of salvation. I look forward to the day when all the stuff of today melts away at his presence, when fear, pain and death are no more, when the ultimate purpose for my life is revealed. The truth is often I lose sight of that hope and look for things to hope in that are present – things I can control. Hope that is seen is not hope. My hope cannot be wrapped up in any of my own packaging.

Hebrews 11:1 says, “Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things unseen.” Faith allows hope to grow. Hope is the joyful expectation of salvation, the confidence to rest, to trust. Faith is the proclamation of who God is in the face of impossible things. And Scripture is clear that God is the source of faith. Ephesians 2:8 and 2 Thessalonians 1:11 both point to His working of faith in our lives. Galatians 5:22-23 include faith as one of the fruits grown by the Holy Spirit as we put to death our passions and desires and walk with Him. I cannot grow faith, but I can surrender to the One who does, knowing He is faithful to do this growth.

God is faithful and true. He is faithful to the work of salvation and sanctification in my life. At the cross, Christ died that I may be set free from all sin, including the sins of doubt and fear that paralyze and blind me. He is faithful to the daily work of changing me and making me more like Him; that is His sanctification. The ways life seems hard, fear inducing, lonely, not worth it — those are often the places God is at work growing my faith, assuring my hope. He is at work. I can name these areas of stretching, yet I resent these very spots.

Proclaiming who God is and what Christ has done in the face of impossible things places my hope on the correct One and anchors my soul. My shield of faith protects me from every arrow, every lie, every fear the enemy and this world want to throw my way. So what do I need to proclaim? What truths do I need to realign my hope with?

He is Savior and Redeemer despite my sin and for my sin.

He is Counselor and Teacher who leads me to His perspective and readies my heart for His ways.

He is sovereign in the face of feeling as if life is out of control.

He is true peace in the midst of the storms of finances or jobs.

He is truth when I am surrounded by the lies of compromise or confusion.

He is the Way giver when it seems like all ways are wrong or blocked.

He is Hope when everything seems hopeless.

He is unchanging Love in the face of a demand for performance.

He is completely engaged in a world where attention is fleeting.

He is trustworthy and takes care of my people better than I ever could.

He is full of grace and mercy, meeting me on my prodigal road with arms wide open.

He has successfully dealt with my past, steadily walks with me in my present, and firmly holds my future assured.

Help me, Lord, to hope in all that You are.

I haven’t moved

Keep your life free from love of money, and be content with what you have, for he has said, “I will never leave you nor forsake you.” So we can confidently say, “The Lord is my helper; I will not fear; what can man do to me?” ~Hebrews 13:5-6

I have learned to love getting up early in the morning while everyone else is sleeping and spend some quiet time with the Lord. Often during the day I feel rather attention deficit, as if I never complete a thought all the way to its conclusion. In the quiet of early morning, my thoughts are clearer, there is less noise crowding the truth of God’s Word and less activity for my attention to be divided over.

Until my little early riser picks up his head and calls for me. Then all bets are off. He is a child who is tightly bound to me, desiring my presence always, wanting to be in conversation with me continuously. In the course of a 30 minute morning window, he will sit with all his toys right at my feet and probably say my name at least 150 times (breaks down to approximately 5 times a minute) His head swivels often to check to make sure I am still in my chair, and he tries incessantly to pull me into his conversation and his play. So this morning he wandered behind some chairs with his play, and suddenly looking up, he panicked and called for me.

“I haven’t moved, buddy. I love you.”

He peeked around to see me and then ran to fold himself into my lap, reassured that in that moment he wasn’t as alone as he had felt.

I was struck with my sentence that God doesn’t move. He doesn’t.

In the difficult, the busy, the painful, or the lonely, God doesn’t move. He loves you and me. If I’m honest, there are many parts of the day where I try to escape my little shadow, shake him off for a little bit while encouraging him that he can play with another sibling. But I am not God, thankfully. God never needs a break, never sneaks away, and never tunes us out.

In Joshua 1, Moses had died, and God imparts to Joshua the authority of leading the Israelites into the Promised Land. “Just as I was with Moses, so I will be with you. I will not leave you or forsake you.” The author of Hebrews takes this Old Testament promise and pulls it into the New Testament as a promise for the saved. He promises to never leave – in the Greek, the word means to slacken or loosen a grip, to relax or release. This word choice also implies a refusal to let sink – in the Gospels, Peter desperately wanted to walk on water to meet Christ. And we can all point to his heart and his reasons for leaping out of the boat, overeager to go to Christ, desperate to mimic.

But Jesus never allowed him to sink.

His grip on Peter never faltered despite Peter’s impulsiveness, and He pulled him out of the cresting waves, calming his anxious heart. His righteous right hand upholds and sustains (Is. 41:10,13)

He also will not forsake you – to leave behind, desert, or abandon. He will always be with me. His presence, His companionship, His friendship, and His fatherhood – they are never withdrawn. When all others in this world seem to have abandoned me, He faithfully sustains, ministers, and encourages. I however can move; unfortunately I can easily drift. That is the warning of the first part of this verse. My flesh can seek to be self sufficient. The presence of God then seems far away, but my repentance brings about restoration.

So we can confidently say – because of these truths of who God is and what He has graciously given me in relationship with Him, confidence becomes a hallmark of my life. Psalm 118:6 is the quoted verse here in Hebrews: The LORD is on my side; I will not fear. What can man do to me? Confidence is not because of something I do or a feeling I sustain. My confidence must rest in the truth of His faithfulness and strength. There is a song that says, “Help me let you go, help me give up control, of the God I made you, when  my fear has contained you.”

God doesn’t move, but often I do. I may place on God the limitations of presence and loyalty that I have experienced with people. I find myself behind the looming chairs of fear, doubt, and worry. He doesn’t let go, and He never abandons. He is faithful to us, patient and long suffering in his steadfast love for us.


Growing an Oak

Blessed is the man who walks not in the counsel of the wicked, nor stands in the way of sinners, nor sits in the seat of scoffers; but his delight is in the law of the LORD and on his law he meditates day and night. He is like a tree planted by streams of water that yields its fruit in its season, and its leaf does not wither. In all that he does, he prospers. ~Psalm 1

Many years ago, God showed me a word picture that realigned my thoughts on raising my children and gave me a vision that has helped so much in the difficulties of discipling and shepherding them. Troy and I moved into a home that was in essence new construction. I excitedly began planning how to landscape the lot, choosing trees, shrubs, and perennials with care with an extremely limited budget. I love gardening and could just imagine the beauty that would soon become my yard! I anticipated the maturing of all the plants and how different things would look in different seasons.

Over the course of the next few years, the yard became just that – a yard – to be cared for, weeded, tended. We had a house full of children and were very busy in the middle of raising them. I have been blessed with very exuberant children – full of zest for life, confidence, “leadership qualities” they say. One of my friends has said that I don’t seem to get the quiet, retiring child (and I’m not sure that was a compliment!) And in a season of real challenge with one of my little ones, I remember beseeching the Lord on that child’s behalf, wondering what would work better, create better change, do what I saw happening in other people’s kids. And God brought me to 2 scriptures – Psalm 1 and Jeremiah 17. So I began praying fiercely for this child with these passages, asking the Lord to show me this strong tree growing in my child. I was looking for tangible results, conversations of that child’s faith deepening, hearing beautiful prayers, seeing a child who managed their strong sin issues in family dynamics, desperately seeking to see the life that the Spirit brings.

And I will say this – none of that is wrong when put in its rightful place. Prayer, mommas, is THE MOST POWERFUL thing we can commit to doing for our children. Pray for their heart to be tender to the Gospel, open to His truth and His working in them. And look for the fruit that you may commend them and encourage them – but watch your reason. You see, in those moments I was hunting for this child’s maturing for my gain – my peace of mind, peace in my home, to look like I had a kid who was well behaved, to measure up to the other kids I saw around me and therefore to appear to have this parenting thing down, otherwise known as pride.

I would walk outside in my yard, tending to the flowerbeds and having conversations with God. One of these difficult parenting days, I escaped outside to walk in my yard. I walked to where I had planted an oak tree. When it had been planted, I remember being disappointed in its size compared to the cost for it. I knew oaks were slow growing, and when this baby tree came to my yard, all I could think was that I would never see it really be what it had the potential to become. Then I walked around the front of the house and noticed that the neighbor’s house had lost a beautiful pear tree the night before in a storm. The tree was cracked in half, crumpled across their driveway. And in that moment God defined for me His perspective for my children.

A pear tree is a fast growing, ornamental tree with big branches and beautiful foliage in each season. Until it’s not. The root system of a pear tree is shallow or high and tends to circle around the narrow base of its trunk, sending out intertwining rootlets that fail to provide strength and instead create instability that leads to falling or death. The branches of the tree all diverge from a single, short trunk as well which allows for the beautiful display in the early years. The wood however is weak, and the trunk of the tree often cannot take the stress of wind gusts causing the tree to crack.

The root system serves as the anchor in a storm. It defines the health or illness of the tree. Oak trees have a slow growing root system that begins with a tap root. A tap root grows vertically downward. It will only then begin to grow its branches outward, but ultimately the roots of an oak occupy a diameter 4-7x the tree’s crown and total hundreds of miles. Oak trees grow very slowly because not until their taproot is established and root system in place will they begin to establish greater foliage and branch growth.

I need to embrace the fact that I must create environments that God can grow oak trees, not pear trees. But that’s all I do – I cannot ever grow the tree. That is the work of God alone. He sees the root, not me. He monitors the growth where it matters, but I only see the branches and leaves. My outlook needs to be committed to a long range vision, working daily in the short term for something that will take years to develop. And I need to stop looking at all the other trees being grown and comparing my trees to them because some of them may just be pear trees. Roots take a long time to grow in oak trees, but once established, oak trees aren’t easily damaged with a season of drought or even heat. Growth is abundant and consistent in trees well established.

Often the beauty of the oak tree is in its age. As a mother, I am committed for the lifetime. This task seems hard at times, discouraging at others – mainly because we cannot see the end result. We cannot see when or how our children will become the oaks of righteousness (Is. 61:3) we desire. The magic number for the maturation of an oak is not 18 years, nor is it the number for our children. We need to stop having that mindset! I’m not done when they turn 18 or leave for college or even when they get married.

My role has changed from nose wiper and discipliner to listener and exhorter, but the child hasn’t stopped growing, the branches may not be spread yet at all, and tap root growth may still be happening. Am I committed to the process of pointing back to Jesus if that means this oak tree doesn’t become one until I am gone? Yes, and I hope I die with callused knees from many years of interceding on their behalf.

Grace abounds

Now the law came in to increase the trespass, but where sin increased, grace abounded all the more, so that, as sin reigned in death, grace also might reign through righteousness leading to eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord. ~Romans 5:20-21

Grace abounds all the more! Where my sin increases, grace abounds all the more. I am a mess as a mother. I am impatient, selfish, judgmental, prideful, demanding my way, quick to get angry, and so much more. The more time I spend mothering with Jesus, the more I see how much He needs to change in me. Often I want to point to the places I’m doing ok or even managing well at the moment as testimony to how I am as a mother, but the truth is He is changing me day by day.

Through Jesus Christ, I have been rescued from the Law, carried out of a burning building where I was doomed to fail and ushered and welcomed into a new home. Clothed anew, fed and given drink, cleaned, given a place, given a purpose. But these gifts are inside the house of grace and gospel of Jesus Christ. Part of growing in faith is understanding the room, the castle, and the kingdom in which I now live. I need to explore and understand all the ways salvation changes me, what is offered, how Christ interacts with me, and what it means to walk with His Spirit.

Often we make the gospel a door we walk through back into the old life just with a tag change on our clothes. We’ve been saved, but we think we need to navigate the old burning house of law and works. We measure our righteousness by our works, check off lists of attributes we think we need to develop, and wonder why we experience a silence that feels deafening in our walk with God. We have a religion and not a walk of grace.

And I know my heart, I know my sin that resides and can reign. Sin isn’t just the glaring committed acts of wickedness easily labeled by others, but it is all encompassed by the independence of me apart from God for whatever reason. Sin denies God his glory and makes me independent of Him. Deuteronomy 6:5 says, “You shall love the LORD you God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your might.” We all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God.

So how do I stand in a room of gospel and grace when I am desperately wicked in my allegiance to myself? My heart always pushes for self; the war, the battle is great as to who will reign. Shouldn’t I be kicked out, removed, or at least pushed to the edge? But God who is rich in mercy, whose grace abounds, who pursues us with a never ending love, He will not allow it! His kingdom isn’t sourced, powered, maintained, or dependent on me. Jesus Christ defeated all that I wrestle with at the cross. His grace sets me free! I have died to sin, united with Him in his death, and am now alive to God in Christ Jesus. Romans 6:22, “But now that you have been set free from sin and have become slaves of God, the fruit you get leads to sanctification and its end, eternal life.” His work in me slays the sin and self reliance and makes me a little more like Him every day. That is the work of sanctification.

Grace abounds – we now live in His kingdom of grace when we are saved. Salvation comes when we recognize our sin and turn to him as the only One who can free us from the bondage of death sin has inflicted on us. His death pays our sin debt. His resurrection assures us life eternal. His life in us is our new identity, and grace is our new home. There is no getting out of it, falling from it, walking away from it. You, Lord, do not flinch with the reality of my need for your grace. You readily supply more than enough. Your grace abounds!


8 – Shepherd

I am the Good Shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for his sheep…I am the good shepherd. I know my own and my own know me, just as the Father knows me and I know the Father; and I lay down my life for the sheep. ~John 10:11,14-15

Hunted, harassed, scattered, hungry, lost or safe, comforted, held, full, found. The difference lies in the presence of a shepherd, a good shepherd. Shepherds populate the scriptures, the patriarchs of the Jewish faith were all shepherds: Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Moses, and David. God uses this word picture both to encourage and warn Israel through the Psalms, Isaiah, and Ezekiel passages. Jesus lays claim to this title in John 10 by contrasting a true, good shepherd with one who robs or abandons the flock.

Jesus declares that He lays down his life for his sheep. This picture was understood by the Jews at the time, for that was exactly the risky position of a shepherd. In Biblical times the shepherd was fierce, warrior like with great endurance, and protective of his flock. Robbers and wild animals threatened by day and night. The shepherd was the guardian, allowing or limiting access to the flock, leading them to safe places to sleep, and defending them against any and all attack. A poor man with just a few sheep may hire another to watch his sheep, but Jesus points out the lack of allegiance and protection to the flock when danger comes.

The shepherd was also intimately acquainted with his sheep. Often shepherds will name their sheep and can see the unique traits or characteristics of each sheep and discern between them. Several shepherds may work together with their flocks in order to share the protection and pasturing duties, but when time comes for separation, the task is simply done. The shepherds will stand and call for their sheep. The sheep will begin to separate and follow based on the tone of voice and call of their own shepherd. Again Jesus reminds his listeners that as the good shepherd, He knows his sheep and they know Him just like his relationship with his Father. The intimacy of that relationship should make us pause and soak in the truth of how well He knows us! To be truly known – it is something we all hunger for and fear at the same time. Jesus knows me intimately. He knows my motivating thoughts, wandering ways, the sin that so easily entangles me, and He gave his life for me!

Psalm 23 cites the beauty of being his sheep, of drawing up alongside the One who knows the path to walk in, provides food and water, protects and guides. The shepherd searches continually for green pastures and feeding ground for his flock. He also looks for still waters because rushing water frightens sheep and discourages them from drinking. If there is no still water, the shepherd will lead the sheep to a well for refreshment. The shepherd’s rod and staff bring comfort to the psalmist. The rod was a stick with a thick bulbous end, often with nails, metal, or some sort of sharp weapon tip that was primarily used to ward off enemies. The staff is what we often picture shaped as a hook which can encircle the sheep’s hind leg and force the sheep to pause, balancing on the other three legs. Then the shepherd can redirect or tend to wounds or injuries the sheep may have. The sling that David had when he battled Goliath was a common tool as well for a shepherd. Useful as a weapon against predators, the sling would also be used to expertly sling a stone out further than a wandering sheep, causing the sheep to turn back inward towards the flock.

God displays his shepherd heart in Ezekiel 34. He contrasts His care for his people with the poor leadership of Israel that had resulted in judgment. There is much leadership in this world that is empty, damaging, neglectful, and deceitful. But God delineates in Ezekiel 34 everything that has not been done and promises instead to be the Great Shepherd.

Do you know you need a Shepherd? Do you see the emptiness, pain, and wounds that come from walking without Jesus? Do you know that the Shepherd searches for you? He longs for nothing else than to carry you into His fold, protect you, care for you, bind up your wounds, and strengthen you. Or are you the wandering sheep, fearing you may stay lost because you have wandered too far? He promises to seek and bring back the straying. He rescues. Are you weary in your working? There are shepherds here who teach us to work hard, be good, earn accolades, do a list that signifies your walk with God. God declares that He will make us lie down in good grazing land and on rich pasture, allowing us to rest in Him. He will lead you in paths of righteousness and restore your soul.

When we look at the truth of the gospel and understand our position with salvation as sheep with the good Shepherd, we should rejoice! What relief should fill our hearts that the hardship of walking lost, confused, and hunted like prey is no longer our judgment. For you were straying like sheep, but have now returned to the Shepherd and Overseer of your soul. (1 Peter 2:25) We are free from wandering. We are found, not lost. We are protected, not harassed. We are cared for and not abandoned.

7 – Adonai

O LORD, our Lord, how majestic is your name in all the earth! You have set your glory above the heavens. ~Psalm 8:1

Studying the different names of Jesus has been incredible, and something I look forward to in my sitting time with Him. There is no book or study I am using and if we were sitting together at coffee, I would encourage you to do the same. I made a list of names for Jesus and the basic scripture references to begin with each day, and every few days I will explore a new name. God is very faithful in teaching us all when we sit with Him and His Word! If you have never just explored a theme or a truth in Scripture independent of an already written Bible study, can I be the one to encourage you to do it? The Holy Spirit, who lives in you as a believer, is our teacher and our helper. He guides us into truth and will help as you walk in the Word. And if the idea of comprising your own list makes you worried or feel inadequate, I will be happy to share a basic list, just email me. (But it is very basic – just names and a passage of scripture, God will lead and teach you the rest!)

So Adonai – Lord God, Mighty King. Adonai in scripture in the Old Testament is written Lord with lower case letters. Have you ever noticed that in Scripture there are sometimes two ways to print Lord? They will write it LORD or Lord. Sometimes you will also see Lord GOD. These different printings signify two different names of God. So in Psalm 8 above, the first LORD is different than the second Lord. I have been studying the second Lord – Adonai.

Adon in Hebrew means master or lord and could refer to a man as lord, or one who rules over another. Adonai is the plural form of Adon. It only refers to God and points to the Trinity in the Old Testament; The ai suffix speaks to His supremacy as Lord, Lord of all. RC Sproul states that this suffix stresses the sovereignty of God as All Ruler. So Adonai means God’s right to rule because of His great might and sovereignty. In worshipping Adonai, I am absolutely recognizing His Master or Ruler position and therefore my  position in submission, following His commands and plans.

Often in the Old Testament Adonai is seen with LORD written in all capitals, which is the written English translation for the name for God YHWH. YHWH was God’s chosen name that we first see in the Old Testament when He tells Moses in Exodus 3, “I AM WHO I AM.” So in Psalm 8:1 we see O YHWH, our Adonai or O I AM, our Master, King, Ruler. The positioning of these words  is purposeful- God’s chosen name followed by the acknowledgement that He is Lord over all and therefore we are not. We are part of what He rules, his servants. It is a juxtaposition of God’s faithfulness and self existence as YHWH and His absolute sovereignty as Adonai. The Jews would not speak the name YHWH out loud, instead simply reading the passage as Adonai or Jehovah Adonai.

In the New Testament this same meaning is found in the word Kurios in the Greek language. Paul consistently calls Jesus Lord, tying the OT concept of God’s sovereignty and rule to Jesus Christ. Therefore, since we have been justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ (Rom. 5:1) Salvation calls for me to give up all self sufficiency and independence/control and instead to allow Christ to be what He truly is – Lord of my life. Absolute ownership, authority and power have been given to Him; we see that in both Ephesians 1 and Colossians 1. To call Jesus Lord demands the knee of my life bows to His authority and ownership, submitting my will to His plan. The daily working out of His grace in salvation differs from the moment of salvation. Salvation from the condemnation of sin, the guilt and judgment came the moment I believed Jesus Christ was my Savior, my only answer for the sin present in my life (Rom. 10:9). Now salvation is at work in my life. The Holy Spirit is continually working in me as I yield myself to Him, delivering me from the power of sin daily and shaping my heart and will more and more into His image (Phil. 2:12-13). And one day I will rejoice for eternity as I am fully saved, made complete, when I stand before Him and have the awesome privilege of worshiping Him forever. This is the grace of the gospel. Jesus Christ is Lord.



So let us comfort

Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies and God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our affliction, so that we may be able to comfort those who are in any affliction, with the comfort with which we ourselves are comforted by God. ~2 Cor. 1:3-4

Often we face seasons filled with hardship, chaos, pain, and even affliction. In the last few years, Troy and I have faced a lot of unknowns – God has walked us through some scary seasons filled with new babies, cancer diagnoses, a new job and city, children with serious medical illnesses, parents with cancer, and the loss of loved ones. We have wept tears of pain, joy, and relief. We have felt alone in a new city and experienced new friends feed us, care for our other children, encourage and pray for us. We have had seasons so weary of bad news that we have cried out to God wondering why. Why us? Why now?

This has been a week of threshing. Not because of some great spiritual dilemma; no, this is the threshing that can only come from the stomach bug. It is one thing that can completely wreck me – 10 people who can get sick, violently ill, unpredictably, anywhere, on anything. Ugh, it’s one of the worst! And it has come to our home this week. Our 2 year old was the first (probably patient zero) and of course by caring for him, I fell next. My big kids have been amazing! So helpful, kind, willing to support one another – School was done, meals prepared, rooms cleaned, really amazing. But still I lay in the bed unable to move or breathe deeply, fearing the pukes and mildly wanting to die. I wonder why me? Why now? Couldn’t I have just skipped this? God, if I were last to get this, all of this would be a lot easier given the laundry, food, and cleaning issues mounting.

And then it hits another preschooler and immediately I jump into action, weakly staggering down the hall to get cleaning supplies and shooing healthy teens back in order to hopefully protect them from actually getting this dreaded thing. As I comfort the upset, fearful little one with words that reassure, I quickly get her bathed, redressed, tucked into a new bed, and quarantined beside me and the baby in the sick bay. I lay back down, fearful of who will fall next. The one thought that begins to crystallize is that maybe it is fortunate I wasn’t the last hold out, that instead I was 2nd man down. Why? Because now I am free to comfort, nurture, and care for all my little ones without residual fear of catching it.

Typically fear mounts during these onslaughts and begins to whisper at me every time another child falls prey to this kind of virus. I’m not always the most nurturing if you’re over the age of 10 (mainly because I guess you’ve hit the age of accountability with getting the pukes in the toilet) so you may not get all the loving care you were used to prior to that birthday, especially if you are later in the game to get sick. My tank seems to run out because now the contagious factor has so mounted that I know it’s just a matter of time for me, and I want to limit all contact!

And while I know there is no one who would welcome the stomach virus just to be able to identify with another, God has been highlighting this truth to me in this week. My ability to comfort another is linked to the comfort I have received from Him. We comfort because we have been brought through adversity, not because we have just heard about the hardship or difficulty. No, we comfort because God has faithfully walked us through, and we can point to Him for the ones caught in the struggle. We become His ambassadors, His hands and feet to offer comfort, rest, help, and truth to the ones wracked by hardship that feels overwhelming and never-ending.

So I wonder, what do I know of this comfort? I love what Spurgeon said about the beginning of this verse – by blessing God, we “destroy distress by bringing God upon the scene.” How many times do I stew in my distress whether it be little like a virus or seemingly insurmountable like cancer, job loss, family stress, or death? Do I spend time first in my whining and wondering, succumbing to all the what ifs and fears of what may come? or do I rise and bless God? Comfort blossoms out of the truth of who God is. He is sovereign, constant, unchanging, and faithful. His sovereignty declares that He hasn’t lost control of one single thing that seems to be spiraling out of control. His constancy promises His presence right with me in the struggle. His unchanging nature means that comfort will be given in an ongoing, meaningful way because He is the Father of all mercies. And He is faithful to supply all the comfort needed. He is the Source of all I need in my time of need.

His comfort is unlike any other. Comfort comes from the Greek word parakaleo meaning to call for, exhort, encourage, strengthen and console. It is the steady truth of the Scripture coming alive on the page as I seek Him. His words actively slicing through my layers of fear, panic, numbness, or pain. It is the faithful allegiance, service, and prayers of the Tychicus, Titus, and Epaphrus friends in life – the warriors who will stand in the gap and bring encouragement on the dark days. It is the miraculous moment when something shifts that seemed immovable, and you instantly know the hand of God was involved. But most importantly, His comfort comes through the Comforter, the great Paraclete. The Holy Spirit indwelling you and me as believers. Ephesians 1:13-14 declares this truth that when you heard the word of truth, the gospel of your salvation, and believed in him, were sealed with the promised Holy Spirit. Jesus declared that the best thing for us would be the Comforter or Helper who would come. He guides us into truth, causes us to abound in hope, grants us unity, regenerates, and renews us.

But if I resist or resent my struggle, how can I comfort another? If I redefine it so that I don’t have to walk through the struggle or if I refuse the difficult road God calls me to, there is no ground for comforting another. When I run to quick fixes or hide in holes of denial, I declare that He is not my comforter. And I am empty when faced with another who desperately needs to hear the truth of Who He is. The spread of the Gospel is rapid and fierce when we, having walked through the fires, can testify to not being burned. Hope is offered to the world when we can point to the waters that seemed to overwhelm us and then share the peace of God which restrained the despair so that we did not drown. The world is desperate for comfort. The body of believers is desperate for comfort. Let us walk as comforters because we know and have been comforted by Him.